Design Technology

The DT Department at Up Holland deliver Resistant Materials, Electronic Products, Food Studies, Health and Social Care and Textiles;

Resistant Materials

At KS3 Resistant Materials is studied as part of the Design Technology rotation in Years 7, 8 and 9. Resistant Materials encourages pupils to be able to design and make products with creativity and originality, using a range of materials and techniques often including CAD and CAM with our new laser cutter. Skills and topics covered include; analysis and research in existing products, marking out and cutting, joining of materials, finishing materials,  vacuum forming, designing solutions and shading and rendering. For the Design and Make activity the theme can alter to suit pupil interest and recent product innovations. For example in Year 7 pupil design a “game in box” and in Years 8 and 9  combined Resistant Material and Electronics design and make activities include a lamp and fuse tester and an audio amplifier. Our KS3 course has been designed to enable pupils to move smoothly forward on to KS4 GCSE.

At KS4 we offer Design Technology: Resistant Materials with AQA. This specification encourages pupils to actively engage in the processes of design and technology to develop as effective and independent learners. This covers two units. Unit 1 is worth 40% and is a written examination. For this unit pupils develop a working knowledge of materials and components, design and market influences, sustainability of design, designing, evaluation, sustainability and health and safety issues. Unit 2 is worth 60% and is designing and making in practice for which pupils choose a theme for their Controlled Assessment task. This project follows a clear design process including investigating the design context, development of design proposals, making and testing and evaluation. Past themes to choose from have been wide and varied and have included storage devices, coffee tables, sports or musical accessories and audio amplifiers.

More useful information and answers to the most commonly asked questions can be found at http://www.aqa.org.uk/rn/askaqa.php.

Electronic Products.

At KS3 Electronic Products is studied as part of the Design Technology rotation in Years 8 and 9. This subject area encourages pupils to be able to design and make electronic products with creativity, originality and flair using a range of components with appropriate materials to package the electronic circuit. For the Design and Make activity the theme can alter to suit pupil interest and recent product innovations. For example in Years 8 and 9 combined Resistant Material and Electronics design and make activities include a lamp and fuse tester and an audio amplifier. Our KS3 course has been designed to enable pupils to move smoothly forward on to KS4 GCSE.

At KS4 we offer Design Technology : Electronics with AQA. This specification encourages pupils to actively engage in the processes of design and technology to develop as effective and independent learners. This covers two units. Unit 1 is worth 40% grade and is a written examination. For this unit pupils should develop a working knowledge of materials and components, electronic system blocks, ICT, processes and manufacture, circuit symbols and calculations. Unit 2 is designing and making in practice for which pupils choose a theme for their Controlled Assessment task. This project follows a clear design process including investigating the design context, development of design proposals, making and testing and evaluation. Past themes to choose from have been wide and varied and have included games for fairgrounds, shop displays, alarm systems and road safety. More useful information and answers to the most commonly asked questions can be found at http://www.aqa.org.uk/rn/askaqa.php.

Textiles.

At KS3 Textiles is studied as part of the Design Technology rotation in Years 7, 8 and 9. Textiles enables pupils to demonstrate their creativity, with the designing and making of products forming the main focus for assessment. Skills and topics covered include; health and safety, use of dyes, printing and stitching, fabric construction,  decorative stitching, functions of the sewing machine, hand and machine sewing skills, stencilling, applique, paints, seams and SMART materials. For the Design and Make activity the theme can alter to suit pupil interest and current national events. For example, using the seascape theme to produce a decorative Textile piece using skills and techniques gained. Our KS3 course has been designed to enable pupils to move smoothly forward on to KS4 GCSE.

At KS4 we offer Design Technology :Textiles with AQA. This specification encourages pupils to be inspired, moved and changed by following a broad, coherent and worthwhile course of study as well as gain insight into related sectors such as manufacturing and engineering. This covers two units. Unit 1 is worth 40% grade and is a written examination. For this unit pupils should develop a working knowledge of textiles materials and components appropriate to modelling, prototyping and manufacturing. Topics covered include; fibres and fabrics, finishing processes, components, design and market influences, product analysis and health and safety issues.  Unit 2 is designing and making in practice for which pupils choose a theme for their Controlled Assessment task . This project follows a clear design process including investigating the design context, development of design proposals, making and testing and evaluation. Past themes to choose from have been wide and varied and included punk, sixties, all things British- vintage, rainforest, musical theatre costumes and museum gift shop products.

Food Studies.

At KS3 Food is studied as part of the Design Technology rotation in Years 7, 8 and 9. Topics include food safety and hygiene, healthy eating, oven management, bacterial control, vegetarianism, special dietary needs and celebrity chefs. There are many food groups covered such as dairy, fruit and vegetables, cake making methods, sauces, cereals and ethnic foods. Dishes made cover a wide range of skills including knife skills, safe use of cooker, weighing and measuring, roux sauce and all cake making methods. Recipes are often adapted to suit and are as follows:-

Year 7 – Fruit Salad. Pizza. Flapjacks. American Muffins. Mash. Soups.

Year 8- Fruit Crumble. Fruit Buns. Pasta Bake. Spaghetti Bolognaise.

Year 9-  Risotto. Swiss Roll. Stir Fry. Decorated cheesecake.

At KS4 we offer WJEC Catering. This covers two units. Unit 1 is worth 60% of the final examination grade and is the practical element assessed in Year 10 and Year 11. The assessment involves making a range of high level dishes in a given time and themes to choose from include afternoon tea, dairy, fruit and vegetables, international foods and special dietary needs. Unit 2 is the written examination and covers a wide range of knowledge which underpins their applied skills such as; the wider industry, job roles, health safety and hygiene, food preparation, nutrition and menu planning, costing and portion control, specialist equipment, communication and record keeping and environmental considerations.

Health and Social Care

GCSE (OCR) in Health and Social care is a vocational subject. Vocational GCSEs give a more practical approach to learning and broaden the opportunities for students.

The specification consists of 2 units (see below). The overall grade for the qualification is based on the total results for all three units. GCSE in Health and Social Care introduces students to a wide variety of work. For example evaluating a range of health and social care services and organisations, increasing their knowledge of influences on an individual’s health and well-being and examining the influences on individual development. The qualification is divided into two units:-

 

  • Unit 1 – Controlled Assessment (worth 60% of final grade). Health, social care and early years provision, is about the services available in the community and how people access them.
  • Unit 2 – written examination- Understanding personal development and relationships and looks at the physical, intellectual, emotional and social characteristics of each life stage.All GCSEs in vocational subjects include some “traditional” classroom based teaching. However, to learn what happens in the work place, they also involve more practical learning approaches such as: visiting speakers from key organisations such as nursery nurses, social workers and NHS employees. Group project work and presentations are also used as a way to assess progress. There is a choice of directions after taking GCSE in health and social care, which build upon students previous achievements in both general and vocational qualifications on an equal footing. Vocational GCSEs are an introduction to a broad vocational area, rather than training for entry into specific occupations.

 

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